My name is Allison. I create things.
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Reblogged from ask--luxord  173 notes
who in the organization is the best at Cards Against Humanity
Anonymous

ask--luxord:

I think the question you’re looking for is “who is the worst member of the organization”

And it’s a tie between larxene and demyx just so you konw

Reblogged from storykind  213,808 notes

getsby:

y’all are like “ooh everyone is beautiful” “ooh everyone deserves to feel hot” and then three seconds later you’re making fun of people who cover their acne with makeup and people who haven’t mastered winged eyeliner yet like grow the hell up you don’t get to pick and choose times to be body positive

Reblogged from kuukki  129,886 notes

avenqcrs:

hey you

yes you

is today your first day of school? tomorrow? or maybe it’s your 50th day of school?

either way

youre looking great

you are going to rock this

i believe in you

youre gonna knock em out of the park, champ

best wishes, 

me

Reblogged from this-sexy-blog  145,374 notes
sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image